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The Subversion Will Not Be Televised: An Interview with Vinoth Ramachandra

The Other Journal (TOJ): Dr. Ramachandra, it is an honor to talk with you about your recent book Subverting Global Myths and about how your work might help us understand faithfulness in the current biopolitical landscape. I want to start off with a basic question: Given your travels across the world and your experiences in both cultures of the West and the developing world, or... Read More

A Message to the Fine and Shabby: James’s Epistle on Poverty

In what is perhaps the most socially conscious ethical writing of the New Testament, the writer of James proclaims that faith without works is dead, that social justice is to be the signpost of our Christianity. Like the Old Testament book of Amos, James is most concerned with issues of poverty,1 and within this context, the writer of James takes a surprisingly communal approach,... Read More

Clement, Badious, and Prometheus: On Christianity as Mediated Revolution

The transition of power in a major world government poses a good opportunity for Christians to pause and consider what we truly want for the governance of our cities and nations. What are we theologically entitled to hope for as a projection of a common good? What do Christian creeds, habits, and ideals tell us about the sort of political spaces we ought to desire? The coincidence... Read More

What Would Nietzsche Do?

In the 2004 senatorial race for Illinois, Republican candidate Allen Keyes claimed, “Christ would not vote for Barack Obama, because Barack has voted to behave in a way that it is inconceivable for Christ to have behaved.”1 Keyes specifically had in mind Obama’s refusal to support a bill that would protect infants who are born alive after botched abortions. While I am... Read More

Why the Opposite of Liberalism Is Not Conservatism: A Book Review of ‘How to Be Evangelical without Being Conservative’ by Roger Olson

Occasionally I read books that trigger an “I wish I had written that!” response, books that put in writing exactly what I have been thinking. But never have I had that feeling as strongly as when I read Roger Olson’s How to Be Evangelical without Being Conservative. Olson gently but firmly implodes all the false dichotomies and artificial structures that evangelical... Read More

Naming an Ancient Affliction in a Postmodern Age: An Interview with Kathleen Norris, Part I

Kathleen Norris is an award-winning poet, best-selling author, and widely embraced voice of faith, intelligence, and beauty. Her recently released nonfiction book Acedia and Me: A Marriage, Monks, and a Writer’s Life is a deeply intimate memoir of loss and an articulate exploration of the ancient “bad thought,” or sin, of acedia. In this interview, Norris helps to further... Read More

The Christian and the iPhone: A Primer for Black Friday

I have managed thus far to resist my desires to buy an iPhone through the lucky confluence of several factors: (1) I cannot afford one. (2) In light of the economic state of the world in the last four hundred years, my affection grows almost daily for the economic lifestyle of conservative Anabaptists like the Amish and Bruderhof community, who seem to be among the most economically... Read More

Anarchist Imperatives and Fundamental Change

Amid the winter snows of January, 1776, a journeyman printer and sometime pamphleteer named Thomas Paine took it upon himself to change the political direction of the American colonies. A relative newcomer to New England, Paine had quickly become sensitive to the basic complaints of the colonists against the mother country, and he had gradually discerned the underlying tensions... Read More

Pure Enough

And if the tribal dialect has yet to be sufficiently restored, and if the pique and pallor of the public discourse yet continues to obscure and to efface without the merest whisper of chagrin, one might nonetheless resolve to hold the line within, whenever possible among one’s also wincing cohort, honoring the latent beauty of the true, or, short of truth, what might for the moment pass... Read More

Pure Enough

And if the tribal dialect has yet to be sufficiently restored, and if the pique and pallor of the public discourse yet continues to obscure and to efface without the merest whisper of chagrin, one might nonetheless resolve to hold the line within, whenever possible among one’s also wincing cohort, honoring the latent beauty of the true, or, short of truth, what might for the moment pass... Read More