Book Symposium: Futurity in Phenomenology: Severson’s Reflections on DeRoo

In the review below, Eric Severson takes up Neal DeRoo’s Futurity in Phenomenology: Promise and Method in Hussel, Levinas and Derrida in two respects. First, he addresses the book according to its philosophical pedigree–the work after all deals with a line of thinking in 20th century Continental thought and considers it’s consequences. Severson’s review will be helpful for readers of this site for see how DeRoo’s work fits into the the ongoing conversation... Read More

Book Symposium: Futurity in Phenomenology – “Liturgy as Living the Promise,” DeRoo Responds to Gschwandtner

In the post below, Neal DeRoo responds to the Christina Gschwandtner’s profound reflection on his book Futurity in Phenomenology: Promise and Method in Husserl, Levinas and Derrida. Her post offered some very substantial thoughts on the connections between Neal’s work and the church community by focusing specifically on the topic of liturgy. Neal’s response is equally excellent. Jump into the comments below to interact with Neal. ———– Liturgy... Read More

Book Symposium: Futurity in Phenomenology – Christina Gschwandtner Reviews DeRoo

The following is a review from Christina Gschwandtner in our book Symposium on Neal DeRoo’s Futurity in Phenomenology: Promise and Method in Husserl, Levinas and Derrida. Christina M. Gschwandtner teaches Continental philosophy of religion at Fordham University. She is author of Reading Jean-Luc Marion: Exceeding Metaphysics (Indiana, 2007), Postmodern Apologetics? Arguments for God in Contemporary Philosophy (Fordham, 2012), and Degrees of Givennness: On Saturation in... Read More

Book Symposium: Futurity in Phenomenology – “The Politics of Epistempology,” DeRoo Responds to Simmons

Below is Neal DeRoo’s response to the first review of his book Futurity in Phenomenology in our Book Symposium by J. Aaron Simmons. Neal DeRoo is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Dordt College (Sioux Center, IA). In addition to writing Futurity in Phenomenology, he has co-edited several works in phenomenology and philosophy of religion, including Cross and Khora: Deconstruction and Christianity in the Work of John D. Caputo, The Logic of Incarnation: James K.A. Smith’s... Read More

Book Symposium: Futurity in Phenomenology – “Why Epistemology Still Mattters,” J. Aaron Simmons

J. Aaron Simmons is a regular contributor to the Church and Postmodern Culture blog. He is currently Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Furman University. He is the author of God and the Other: Ethics and Politics After the Theological Turn (Indiana UP, 2011); co-author of The New Phenomenology: A Philosophical Introduction (Bloomsbury, 2013); co-editor of Reexamining Deconstruction and Determinate Religion: Toward a Religion With Religion (Duquesne UP, 2012); co-editor of Kierkegaard... Read More

Upcoming Book Symposium – DeRoo: Futuriity in Phenomenology

Next week we begin a new book discussion with some fantastic philosophers who are also wonderful gifts to the church.Their work in itself challenges the ecclesia in profound ways, but also draws from the deep wells of philosophical thinkers who themselves, may or may not drink from the water of life that Christ gives, yet still offer the church ways to reflect on its own life and see it anew, especially in our very challenging age. The focus of the Symposium with be Neal DeRoo’s... Read More

Book Symposium: Liturgy as a Way of Life (Nathaniel Marx)

In our final review of the Symposium of Bruce Ellis Benson’s Liturgy as a Way of Life, Nathaniel Marx approaches Benson’s book from a different angle, engaging him and his argument with a unique cultural phenomenon that seems at first glance far away from Benson’s topic. But Marx’s cultural exegesis proves just as good as Benson’s and brings this phenomenon easily into conversation with his work, showing as Benson would argue just how much every way... Read More

New Book – Reexamining Deconstruction and Determinate Religion

Given the invigorating discussions that occur on this blog about the intersection of religion and postmodernism, I wanted to just note the publication of a new book that Stephen Minister and I have edited that is likely to be of interest to “Church and Postmodernism” readers.  It is entitled, Reexamining Deconstruction and Determinate Religion: Toward a Religion with Religion (Duquesne University Press, 2012), and features essays by Stephen and I as well as scholars... Read More

Response to Downing: Police at Play

Mea culpa.  How else could I respond to Crystal Downing’s gracious, rightly-critical engagement with The Fall of Interpretation?  In what was a moment of (rather Caputo-an?[1]) flourish, I seem to have blamed an entire discipline for mis-readings of Derrida. And this despite the fact that, as Downing rightly points out, there are plenty of professors of philosophy and religious studies who are equally to blame, and plenty of professors of English who offered astute readings... Read More

The Ghost in The Fall

Unlike Jacques Derrida, who was haunted by specters of Karl Marx, I am haunted by specters of JKA Smith. My first glimpse of Smith’s ghostly presence came in 2005, when an anonymous reader for my soon-to-be published book on postmodernism berated me for never mentioning The Fall of Interpretation. As I checked Smith’s text out of my college library, planning to include it in my last-minute revisions, I noted how well worn it was, as though, like Hamlet’s ghost, it had wandered... Read More