Hominis Deus

The following is a guest post by Kyle David Bennett. Kyle is a recent PhD graduate from Fuller Seminary in philosophy of religion and philosophical theology. Before moving to NYC last year he taught philosophy at Azusa Pacific University and theology and ethics at Providence Christian College. He now teaches religion at The King’s College. He lives in Hoboken, NJ with his wife, Andrea, and their five-year old daughter, Elliott. —————- Incarnation... Read More

Book Symposium: Futurity in Phenomenology–DeRoo Responds to Severson

The following is Neal DeRoo’s response to Eric Severson’s review of Futurity in Phenomenology: Promise and Method in Husserl, Derrida and Levinas. With this post we close our latest Book Symposium. We certainly hope you’ve enjoyed this enriching conversation. And we thank all the contributors, not only for their written words, but for the embodied witness their work gives to us. Such deep and committed reflection is indeed a needed and crucial part of ecclesial... Read More

Book Symposium: Futurity in Phenomenology: Severson’s Reflections on DeRoo

In the review below, Eric Severson takes up Neal DeRoo’s Futurity in Phenomenology: Promise and Method in Hussel, Levinas and Derrida in two respects. First, he addresses the book according to its philosophical pedigree–the work after all deals with a line of thinking in 20th century Continental thought and considers it’s consequences. Severson’s review will be helpful for readers of this site for see how DeRoo’s work fits into the the ongoing conversation... Read More

Book Symposium: Futurity in Phenomenology – “Liturgy as Living the Promise,” DeRoo Responds to Gschwandtner

In the post below, Neal DeRoo responds to the Christina Gschwandtner’s profound reflection on his book Futurity in Phenomenology: Promise and Method in Husserl, Levinas and Derrida. Her post offered some very substantial thoughts on the connections between Neal’s work and the church community by focusing specifically on the topic of liturgy. Neal’s response is equally excellent. Jump into the comments below to interact with Neal. ———– Liturgy... Read More

Book Symposium: Futurity in Phenomenology – Christina Gschwandtner Reviews DeRoo

The following is a review from Christina Gschwandtner in our book Symposium on Neal DeRoo’s Futurity in Phenomenology: Promise and Method in Husserl, Levinas and Derrida. Christina M. Gschwandtner teaches Continental philosophy of religion at Fordham University. She is author of Reading Jean-Luc Marion: Exceeding Metaphysics (Indiana, 2007), Postmodern Apologetics? Arguments for God in Contemporary Philosophy (Fordham, 2012), and Degrees of Givennness: On Saturation in... Read More

Book Symposium: Futurity in Phenomenology – “Why Epistemology Still Mattters,” J. Aaron Simmons

J. Aaron Simmons is a regular contributor to the Church and Postmodern Culture blog. He is currently Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Furman University. He is the author of God and the Other: Ethics and Politics After the Theological Turn (Indiana UP, 2011); co-author of The New Phenomenology: A Philosophical Introduction (Bloomsbury, 2013); co-editor of Reexamining Deconstruction and Determinate Religion: Toward a Religion With Religion (Duquesne UP, 2012); co-editor of Kierkegaard... Read More

Upcoming Book Symposium – DeRoo: Futuriity in Phenomenology

Next week we begin a new book discussion with some fantastic philosophers who are also wonderful gifts to the church.Their work in itself challenges the ecclesia in profound ways, but also draws from the deep wells of philosophical thinkers who themselves, may or may not drink from the water of life that Christ gives, yet still offer the church ways to reflect on its own life and see it anew, especially in our very challenging age. The focus of the Symposium with be Neal DeRoo’s... Read More

The Ghost in The Fall

Unlike Jacques Derrida, who was haunted by specters of Karl Marx, I am haunted by specters of JKA Smith. My first glimpse of Smith’s ghostly presence came in 2005, when an anonymous reader for my soon-to-be published book on postmodernism berated me for never mentioning The Fall of Interpretation. As I checked Smith’s text out of my college library, planning to include it in my last-minute revisions, I noted how well worn it was, as though, like Hamlet’s ghost, it had wandered... Read More

“I am the Church, you are the Church, we are the Church together…”

I first read The Fall of Interpretation (FoI) in the Fall of 2002. I had learned shortly before the semester had begun that the Philosophy of Language class I had signed up for was going to be taught by a new prof, some young guy who looked like he belonged in an Old Navy catalogue rather than in the Ivory Tower (when all you’ve got to go by is a headshot on the department homepage, you make these kind of characterizations, fair or otherwise). As it turned out, he was a pretty... Read More

What Facebook Makes Us

In an interview toward the end of his life, Michel Foucault pointed out that for all the interest in power that his work had generated, he was really more interested in the subject and what effects various forces of power had in terms of creating certain kinds of subjectivities. Those of us who work within and think about the church ought to be concerned about subjectivity. One obvious reason: liturgical formation is meant to make us certain kinds of subjects, or perhaps more... Read More