Book Symposium: Futurity in Phenomenology: Severson’s Reflections on DeRoo

In the review below, Eric Severson takes up Neal DeRoo’s Futurity in Phenomenology: Promise and Method in Hussel, Levinas and Derrida in two respects. First, he addresses the book according to its philosophical pedigree–the work after all deals with a line of thinking in 20th century Continental thought and considers it’s consequences. Severson’s review will be helpful for readers of this site for see how DeRoo’s work fits into the the ongoing conversation... Read More

Book Symposium: Futurity in Phenomenology – “The Politics of Epistempology,” DeRoo Responds to Simmons

Below is Neal DeRoo’s response to the first review of his book Futurity in Phenomenology in our Book Symposium by J. Aaron Simmons. Neal DeRoo is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Dordt College (Sioux Center, IA). In addition to writing Futurity in Phenomenology, he has co-edited several works in phenomenology and philosophy of religion, including Cross and Khora: Deconstruction and Christianity in the Work of John D. Caputo, The Logic of Incarnation: James K.A. Smith’s... Read More

Conference: The Christian Evasion of Popular Culture

Back when Neal DeRoo was writing up his response to Jamie Smith’s The Fall of Interpretation, 2nd ed., he mentioned he was organizing a conference on popular culture. Some of the speakers, he said, would be familar with readers of churchandpomo. The topic, to say the least, is of great interest to many of us. So we invited him to send us a write-up on the conference when it was just around the corner so we could support his efforts and get the word out. Check out the following... Read More

Response to DeRoo: Whose Church? Which Ecclesiology?

I love it that each of my interlocutors has homed in on quite different themes and issues in The Fall of Interpretation.  And as you’ll have guessed, it’s a special treat to engage Neal, one of my star students about whom I regularly brag, taking way more credit than I deserve.  (We also both share a common teacher, Jim Olthuis, whose fingerprints are all over The Fall of Interpretation.)[1] And I love it that Neal has homed in on just the question I think he should be asking... Read More

“I am the Church, you are the Church, we are the Church together…”

I first read The Fall of Interpretation (FoI) in the Fall of 2002. I had learned shortly before the semester had begun that the Philosophy of Language class I had signed up for was going to be taught by a new prof, some young guy who looked like he belonged in an Old Navy catalogue rather than in the Ivory Tower (when all you’ve got to go by is a headshot on the department homepage, you make these kind of characterizations, fair or otherwise). As it turned out, he was a pretty... Read More