Those Which were Possessed by Devils

Pop-culture, Demons and Philosophy Recently, I enlisted a friend to see The Conjuring with me. The movie claims to be based on real events, which seems to be a standard feature for these types of films, and depicts the haunting of a family upon moving into a new home with a grisly past, yet another fairly standard feature. The family enlists the help of self-proclaimed demonologists, Ed and Lorraine Warren, who nearly immediately confirm the affliction as having a demonic source.[1]... Read More

Extended Review and some Possibilities for James K. A. Smith. Imagining the Kingdom: How Worship Works.

Introduction Always read something that will make you look good if you die in the middle of it. –P.J. O’Rourke As I read and re-read Jamie Smith, P.J. O’Rourke’s quote seems rather apposite to my experience of that reading.  I consider that being found dead with one of Smith’s books open in my hands would be a great way to slip away from this life. The influence of Jamie Smith’s work continues to grow, and rightly so.  Just as we have digested his landmark work... Read More

Philosophy and Theology . . . “Analytic” or Not

By J. Aaron Simmons (Furman University, Department of Philosophy) – aaron.simmons@furman.edu   The following are thoughts inspired by the vigorous discussion that recently occurred on Roger E. Olson’s blog. Olson instigated the discussion by commenting that philosophy and theology are distinct disciplines due to the way in which “special revelation” is used by theology, but not by philosophy “AS philosophy” (pay special attention to the back and forth in the... Read More

The Necessity of Another

            From the very first time I was introduced to the work of Jean-Luc Marion, I was captivated with his account of the passive self and saturated phenomenon. Being principally concerned with the human propensity for self-righteousness, Marion’s philosophy provided me with a way to think the Christian experience while steering clear of some of the naughtier habits of the autarkic self. However, in continuing to interact with Marion’s work, I find myself questioning... Read More

Not at-home: rethinking hospitality and homelessness

This Christmas season I had the privilege of attending a memorial service, a vigil in memory of the homeless from our area who had died. Gathered in the early dark of the winter solstice, a group comprised of homeless persons, service providers, and local residents read from a necrology, including twenty names new to the list this year. As we were asked to remember these lives, one of the speakers asked us to remember also that Jesus Christ had been born homeless. This certainly... Read More

CFP: Special issue of RELIGIONS on “Theology and Phenomenology”

Of interest to readers might be this CFP for an upcoming issue of Religions on “Theology and Phenomenology.” The following Special Issue will be published in Religions (ISSN 2077-1444, http://www.mdpi.com/journal/religions/). and is now open to receive submissions of full research papers and comprehensive review articles for peer-review and possible publication: Special Issue: Theology and Phenomenology Website: http://www.mdpi.com/si/religions/theology_phenomenology/ Guest... Read More

Theologians and the Church?

I have recently returned from the Theologians and the Church event that the Centre for Theology and Philosophy hosted at New College, Edinburgh (It was worth the trip just to hear Graham Ward’s plenary). The conference hoped ‘to bring together the next generation of theologians to explore the relationship between academic theology and the worshipping community. Postgraduates from all traditions and none are invited to gather and discuss the role theologians play in the life... Read More

Against ‘Political’ Theology

This and the following post come from the recent panel discussion hosted by the new Political Theologies Seminar at Marquette University.  The seminar is interested in theologies that intersect with contemporary political, social, economic, and cultural life. Participating faculty are  Dr. D. Stephen Long and Emeritus Fr. Thomas Hughson and the coordinator is David Horstkoetter.  Go to the seminar page if you want to download the presentation. The following is an introductory... Read More

Augustinian Inversions: How would the Bishop Contend in Postmodernity?

Over the last several years of studying contemporary (continental) philosophy and theology and the theology of Augustine, I’ve noticed several recurring themes, or rather, inversion of themes between contemporary theological battles and those in which Augustine was involved.  Of course these inversion only makes sense from a broadly Augustinian point of view (which you can feel free to contest), but I think noting these inversions may demystify some common differences and... Read More

“Badiou and Theology”: a not so micro-review

Frederiek Depoortere, Badiou and Theology (Philosophy and Theology). New York: T&T Clark International, 2009. Below is my review of Depoortere's recent book on Badiou.  For a less favorable review see Clayton Crocket's over at NDPR (he sees it as incoherent, but I think this broadly has to do with differing theological outlooks).  I would be very interested in any others interacting with Badiou on a theological level.  I would like to do more work... Read More