Tumblr Vimeo Feed

The Jew from Nazareth and the Problem of Whiteness: J. Kameron Carter’s Theological Account of Race

J. Kameron Carter. Race: A Theological Account. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2008. 504 pages. $28.00 hardcover (Amazon). Click here or on the image to purchase Race from Amazon.com and help support The Other Journal. J. Kameron Carter’s recent book, Race: A Theological Account, is a wrench thrown into the frustratingly predictable modern academic discourse on race. In what will doubtless prove a landmark study on race, Carter engages the fields of theology, sociology,... Read More

Radical Tragedy, Subversive Comedy: On Milbank, Žižek, and The Monstrosity of Christ

Slavoj Žižek and John Milbank. The Monstrosity of Christ: Paradox of Dialectic? Edited by Creston Davis. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2009. 416 pages.$18.45 hardcover. Click on the image to purchase The Monstrosity of Christ from Amazon.com and help support The Other Journal. For at least several decades, there has been a growing convergence between radical philosophy and certain branches of Christian theology. Although the phenomenon is too large and diverse for me to summarize... Read More

Race and Hospitality: Pursuing Racial Reconciliation through Derrida’s Understanding of Hospitality

With the historic 2008 presidential campaign in the United States, the question of race again came to the fore of the American consciousness.1 In this campaign, we saw a number of racially charged news stories–Bill Clinton likened Barack Obama to Jesse Jackson during the South Carolina primary, Rev. Jeremiah Wright riled the nation up with his controversial words, and many in the Republican Party wondered aloud if Barack Obama might be a Muslim or Arab, to name but a few.... Read More

At the Feet of Giants: An Interview with Gregory Wolfe, Part II

Gregory Wolfe is editor and founder of Image, a quarterly journal that has featured prominent writers, sculptors, painters, and poets for over twenty years. The journal also hosts the Glen Workshop, fellowships for emerging writers, learning trips abroad, and numerous speaking engagements across the country. In Part I of this interview Wolfe discusses beauty, and here in Part II he continues this discussion, riffing on the history of the journal and the importance of sleeping... Read More

At the Feet of Giants: An Interview with Gregory Wolfe, Part I

Gregory Wolfe is editor and founder of Image, a quarterly journal that has featured prominent writers, sculptors, painters, and poets for over twenty years. The journal also hosts the Glen Workshop, fellowships for emerging writers, learning trips abroad, and numerous speaking engagements across the country. In Part I of this interview Wolfe discusses beauty, and in Part II he continues this discussion, riffing on the history of the journal and the importance of sleeping... Read More

My Body for You: Meditations on Sacrifice as a Theme in Contemporary Art

(Click on the image to open Bruce Herman’s art exhibit in a resizable browser.)   Sacrifice is a dirty word. It is smeared with the blood of a thousand brutal religions and the ritual mob violence of much human history. Another dirty word is martyr, which seems to suggest a suspicious air of superiority or sanctimoniousness. So why am I drawn to these words—sacrifice and martyrdom? I have an intuition that there is a connection between beauty and sacrifice, between... Read More

Pure Enough

And if the tribal dialect has yet to be sufficiently restored, and if the pique and pallor of the public discourse yet continues to obscure and to efface without the merest whisper of chagrin, one might nonetheless resolve to hold the line within, whenever possible among one’s also wincing cohort, honoring the latent beauty of the true, or, short of truth, what might for the moment pass for it.  Read More

Pure Enough

And if the tribal dialect has yet to be sufficiently restored, and if the pique and pallor of the public discourse yet continues to obscure and to efface without the merest whisper of chagrin, one might nonetheless resolve to hold the line within, whenever possible among one’s also wincing cohort, honoring the latent beauty of the true, or, short of truth, what might for the moment pass for it.  Read More

The Dark Knight of Postmodern Politics: How to Follow the Presidential Election of 2008 in True “Postpartisan” Fashion

The Dark Knight Returns In the movie The Dark Knight, district attorney Harvey Dent, a former crusader against lawlessness who has been seduced by the evil villain known as The Joker into going over to the dark side, jeers at Batman and the police commissioner when they confront him in an abandoned warehouse. “You tried to be decent men in an indecent time,” he jibes, epitomizing what is the controlling theme of this psychologically complex and morally ambiguous Hollywood... Read More

An Interview with Brian McLaren

TOJ: “The” distinction for the emergent church and for younger Christians over the last 10 years has been that of being postmodern. The binary category of being postmodern, rather than modern, and such dedication to that label has given needed identity to younger generations experiencing a new culture. How important do you think it is for emergent churchgoers to understand the philosophical underpinnings of postmodernism such as the ramifications of Deleuze, Derrida,... Read More